SIX EASY PIECES EPUB

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Where can I download physics books like Quantum, 6 Easy Pieces, The For example, here's a download link for Six Easy Pieces: Library. This book reprints the six easiest chapters from Feynman's celebrated Lectures on Physics, which the Nobel Prize-winning scientist delivered. Matthew Sands, Richard Feynman, Robert Leighton Six Easy Pieces: Essentials of Physics Explained by Its Most Brilliant Teacher get epub. Six Easy Pieces.


Six Easy Pieces Epub

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Six Easy Pieces: Essentials of Physics Explained by Its Most Brilliant Teacher Richard P. Feynman, Robert B. Leighton, Matthew Sands epub download. It was Richard Feynman's outrageous and scintillating method of teaching that earned him legendary status among students and professors of physics. of this streetwise New Yorker, we do not forget how he sounds, and it gives us an image Six Not-So-Easy Word Power Made Easy. Pages··

If you're not, please get out from under the rock you've been living under and go learn something.

It took way too many years to get those lectures online after you guessed it a fight over copyrights. Eric Hellman posted the story at the link above, with this being the key part: Vikram Verma , a software developer in Singapore, wanted to be able to read the lectures on his site.

Since the digital format used by site is just a simplified version of html, the transformation of web pages to an ebook file is purely mechanical. So Verma proceeded to write a script to do the mechanical transformation — he accomplished the transformation in only lines of ruby code, and published the script as a repository on Github. So they hauled out the favorite weapon of copyright trolls everywhere: a DMCA takedown. You can see the DMCA here as well as the counternotice , which notes that the software doesn't contain any copyrighted materials though there's some confusion over who owns the copyright, Caltech or Perseus.

Hellman, while admitting he's not a lawyer, further suggests the DMCA takedown is invalid because it's just code This will take about 10 minutes for Verma to work around. In addition, the website now has a robot exclusion except for Googlebot.

Disappointing: DMCA Being Used To Make Feynman Lectures On Physics Less Accessible

Of course, that introduces a new and unfortunate problem. As problematic as it is, the anti-circumvention clause of the DMCA, 17 USC makes it against the law to get around any "technological measure" no matter how stupid or weak, and thus the effort by the website to block it may introduce a new problem, though likely different than what Perseus initially claimed in its takedown.

Making things even more convoluted, the editor of the Feynman Lectures, Michael Gottlieb, jumped into the fray and made things even more confusing and misleading: The online edition of The Feynman Lectures Website posted at www. However, it is under copyright. The copyright notice can be found on every page: it is in the footer that your script strips out!

The online edition of FLP can not be downloaded, copied or transferred for any purpose other than reading online without the written consent of the copyright holders The California Institute of Technology, Michael A.

Gottlieb, and Rudolf Pfeiffer , or their licensees Basic Books. Every one of you is violating my copyright by running the flp. If so, carried by what, and what is space? Feynman says we don't really know what energy is, but does it involve a 'power' differential where matter and energy move to states of equilibrium? If this is so, then is this one way that gravity differences in mass and distance might have a parallel at the quantum level weight of atoms as they combine or recombine?

Feynman writes that "all planets push and pull each other. For that matter, it's also not clear how "push and pull" relate to Einstein's spacetime curvature oddly, Feynman discusses Einstein's relativity only briefly.

Regarding push-pull attraction-resistance Feynman makes some suggestive comments when he states that "the force of electricity between two charged objects looks just like the law of gravitation Elsewhere, Feynman states that "the earth can be understood to be round merely because everything attracts everything else and so it has attracted itself together as far as it can!

While this is all fun stuff to think about, these Feynman lectures do not enlighten much a lay person's understanding of the uncertainty principle, annhilation and antimatter, and absolute time. His last lecture on quantum behavior is particularly difficult.

Feynman is at his best discussing the role of doubt and uncertainty in science. When he differs with the theories of the past or of his contemporaries, he seems respectful enough, saying that they are not wrong, but "a little wrong" or "incomplete.

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He also blends life and non-life together when he says that "'Everything is made of atoms Sep 06, Laoonatic rated it it was amazing.

I think that, when reading this book, you have to be familiar with physics and maths. Which is why people shouldn't consider this book as being no good just because they haven't reached the paradise of enlightment which was promised to them.

Such a thing isn't possible.

Not from a single book, as far as I know, and anyway, not from thi I think that, when reading this book, you have to be familiar with physics and maths. Not from a single book, as far as I know, and anyway, not from this one. I've been studying both maths and physics for quite some time, but in the manner of a poorly prepared educational system, meaning the focus was more on solving problems and ingesting pages of theory and less on really understanding them. And Feynman's lessons really shed some light on the mess in my head.

I can't claim I thoroughly understood everything in this book, but I surely enjoyed Feynman's way of following gradually to smaller scales what happens in an apparently simple process, until he reaches the "core" of it. Also, you can't ignore his way of being even poetic at times, which is really why this book won my heart. I have a weakness for science being romanticized. And all ovations go to Richard Feynman for doing this so tactfully. Jun 05, Cassandra Kay Silva rated it it was amazing Shelves: I think it is very rare for someone to be not only brilliant but also a wonderful teacher.

Feynman has a very clear and direct style of imparting information. I just love it. Not quite as good as his autobiographical one but still very good. View all 3 comments. May 15, Roger rated it really liked it.

Reader Comments

In the early s the renown physicist, Richard Feynman, delivered introductory courses on physics to first and second year undergraduate students at Caltech, in the USA. His lectures were very popular at the time and whilst aimed at undergraduates, it wasn't uncommon for graduate physics students to infiltrate his classes; the one thing Feynman could be assured of was a full house each time he came to teach this course. The lectures, after some editing, were published in three large volumes.

T In the early s the renown physicist, Richard Feynman, delivered introductory courses on physics to first and second year undergraduate students at Caltech, in the USA. To provide a flavour of the overall series, this book extracts just six from the collection and, as the title of this book suggests, these are regarded as being six of the easier ones to understand.

They're entitled "Atoms in motion", "Basic physics, "The relation of physics to other sciences", "Conservation of energy", "The theory of gravitation" and "Quantum behaviour". There is a companion volume published under the title "Six not-so-easy pieces" but I've not attempted to read that.

I was attracted to this book not so much by the subject matter, but more by my interest in Feynman himself. He has a solid reputation for being an inspirational teacher and I was keen to see how he managed to achieve this. I was expecting him to take a different strategy from the norm and I wasn't disappointed. To illustrate what I mean, in his lecture on the atom he didn't follow the conventional approach of describing the structure of atoms and building up from there, yet by the end of the talk his students would have heard a physicist's explanation of why blowing on a bowl of soup cools it down.

His approach to teaching was so different to what is usually done. Understandably, given the date of the lectures, there have been major developments in physics, and science in general, since the lectures were first presented.

For instance, the talk on nuclear physics is very out of date because the make-up of protons and neutrons was not understand at that time to the extent that it is now. Likewise, the lecture covering the links between physics and biology pre-dates the discovery of the genetic code. Therefore, it is pointless reading this book to gain an understanding of the latest theories. Nevertheless, not everything has changed in 50 years and some lectures are as relevant today as they were then.

For example, the lecture on the conservation of energy was wonderfully presented, especially the section on potential energy where Feynman used illustrated examples to explain the conservation of potential energy in reversible machines. On the other hand, I felt he made heavy weather of his account of the two slit experiment in his lecture on quantum mechanics and I've read much better explanations elsewhere.

To a marked extent Feynman did over complicate much of his material but this is to expected since his stated intention was to teach to slightly beyond the level of the brightest students in each class; of course, whether or not this was the best strategy is open to debate.

Overall, this book of six "easy" lectures provides remarkable insight into Feynman's style of teaching. He comes across as someone who knew his subject matter inside out, who had boundless energy and complete self-confidence, and who wanted to stretch the minds of his students. May 11, Mark rated it it was ok Recommends it for: If you have heard about the "weirdness" of quantum mechanics but don't know what the hype is all about, look no further than chapter six of this book.

In chapter six, with his usual down-to-earth approach, Feynman describes one of the most famous experiments in physics the double-slit experiment and what it tells us about the way fundamental particles behave. He compares the behavior of "lumps" to the behavior of "waves" before moving on to the behavior of electrons This is a classic lesson in quantum mechanics taught by one of the classic teachers of physics.

And there's no math required. I only gave this book two stars because the other five lectures in this book aren't overly memorable and come nowhere near to being Feynman's greatest lessons. But chapter six alone makes this book worth picking up, especially if you want an introduction to wave-particle duality, the uncertainty principle, and the conundrum of quantum measurement that is accessible to the layperson but that also demands that you stretch your mind.

It's a brief introduction that cuts to the essence of what is going on and, while giving you a decent grounding, will leave you ready to dig deeper and learn more. Almost five-stars. For someone like me i. However, to be "approximately accurate about everything" means a bunch of math and other fancy-pants equations that Almost five-stars.

However, to be "approximately accurate about everything" means a bunch of math and other fancy-pants equations that look like this: However, Feynman explains the subject matter well—and certainly better than most other folks that have tried to write this sort of thing.

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I'm adding him to my short list of heroes. Apr 20, Connie Kuntz rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Anyone who believes that science and spirituality aren't mutally exclusive. Recommended to Connie by: Christine O'Brien soon to be Dr. This book is truly mind-opening and I am convinced that Feynman was one enlightened dude. As I read the book, I felt myself opening up to the concept of atoms, amalgamations, energy, astronomy, gravity, light years, colliders and quantum physics.

There was humor, history and simplified experiments in the book, too, which gave the field of Physics an "inviting" feeling, rather than a snooty one. The first five chapters were wonderful, but I struggled quite a bit with Chapter 6. To be clear: I sti This book is truly mind-opening and I am convinced that Feynman was one enlightened dude.

I still have no grasp on these difficult theories and concepts but now I feel like I have a genuine appreciation for the science and a new way of looking at our world. I learned something that is diffiuclt for me to articulate but I will try: I learned that Physics truly welcomes the connection between past and present, quantum leaps and forward thoughts, the galaxy and a glass of wine, a spiritual presence and Dennis the Menace and much, much more. Great book. Feynman is as enigmatic as usual and his descriptions are vivid and inspiring.

He begins discussing atoms and shows us how we can understand the world around us using the simple concept of 'jiggling' atoms.

I found this to be a profound and exiting way of understanding how things truly work, for example, why does tea cool down when we blow on it? Well, we cause some of the atoms well molecules in reality of the tea to get so excited and jiggly that they break away from the liquid a Great book.

Well, we cause some of the atoms well molecules in reality of the tea to get so excited and jiggly that they break away from the liquid and fly off into the air.

The more jiggly they are to start with, the more likely they are to break off, thus the tea gets less jiggly and jigglyness is equivalent to heat. Hence the tea gets cooler. The sections on conversational energy, Gravitation and Quantum mechanics are a little basic but interesting nonetheless after all these are the easy pieces! Feb 21, Erkin Unlu rated it liked it. Feb 21, Mike rated it really liked it Recommends it for: I have read several other books by and about Richard Feynman: This book is not really about Feynman, rather it is six chapters excised out of a two-year course of physics lectures he gave at CalTech in the mid 60s.

The publisher created this volume and a second one that I am just getting into called "Six Not-So-Easy Pieces" and a companion aud I have read several other books by and about Richard Feynman: The publisher created this volume and a second one that I am just getting into called "Six Not-So-Easy Pieces" and a companion audio book in Feynman's own voice about 15 years ago.

Although they are not biographical, and I took "freshman physics" a while ago, I picked up these two volumes to read how this man attempted to re-invent the teaching of introductory and intermediate physics. The approaches and "patter" are definitely Feynman's own. His thinking, humor, and enjoyment of "natural philosophy" shine through the pages. Granted the knowledge of cosmology and particle physics contained in this volume are dated it was 45 years ago, give the guy a break!

The title is correct: Nothing that you need to fear: If you have read any of the other books relating Feynman's adventures as a young 20s man working at Los Alamos, the pick this up and see how the man lived and breathed physics.

Six Easy Pieces [EPUB]

You'll be happy you did! Oct 25, Menglong Youk rated it it was amazing Shelves: Quantum Behavior. This by no means implies that the book is difficult as a whole. I thoroughly enjoyed the first three chapters: The method he chose to explain the concepts in these chapters was elegant and easy to understand. He compared our understanding the law of physics to 4. He compared our understanding the law of physics to watching a game of chess played by the gods not personal gods and we humans as observers knowing nothing about the chess rules.

However, I have difficulty with understanding quantum mechanics when he started involving mathematic equation, which I particularly have no formal education. I might as well come back to this chapter once I have a better understanding of mathematics. Overall, I would recommend "Six Easy Pieces" to anyone who is interested in science, physics especially, to check it out. You might have already known the concepts, but you'll be amazed by his styles. I liked 4 out of the 6 pieces, so technically it should be 3.

I didn't like some of them probably because I didn't understand them, and to be fair I didn't focus a lot while reading it, it was more of a leisure read.

The gravitational piece was beautiful. It explained big complex ideas with simple analogies that made sense, some of the laws he discussed I knew already but after reading the lecture it all clicked and the picture was more clear. I didn't like the conservation of energy or I liked 4 out of the 6 pieces, so technically it should be 3.

I didn't like the conservation of energy or quantum mechanics, which makes sense for quantum mechanics because, well. However I actually studied the conservation of energy and liked it, I was excited to get a new perspective on it and to get deeper intuition but the analogies did not make any sense and it all was just too confusing.

Which is why I think rather than a book it would've been better if I just read lectures on the topics that interest me. I still enjoyed the book and I would probably read Feynman again in the future along with my physics courses. Jan 29, Hmd Book rated it really liked it. Sep 15, dopamine rated it liked it. Fred Rogers teaches high school science. Jul 27, Steve rated it liked it Shelves: That subtitle may seem overwrought, but it's true.

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Hawking and Greene have done much to popularize and fetishize physics, but Feynman will help the layperson really start to understand it at its most conceptual, basic form. And if you haven't the ability to sustain fifteen years of advanced mathematics, these lessons can still illuminate the marvels of the "mechanism.The most interesting preface is the one written by Feynman himself for the original edition, in which he talks about how he set about piecing the course together, who it was aimed at and why, and how ultimately he felt that he had let his students down in some way.

Jan 22, Harish Rajamani rated it really liked it. I only gave this book two stars because the other five lectures in this book aren't overly memorable and come nowhere near to being Feynman's greatest lessons. About Richard P. While the book should provide a good conceptual guide to key aspects of modern operating systems, no education is complete without projects.

I think it is very rare for someone to be not only brilliant but also a wonderful teacher.

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