VISUAL NOTES FOR ARCHITECTS AND DESIGNERS PDF

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Featuring completely new coverage of visual note-taking in a digital world, Visual Notes for Architects and Designers, Second Edition demonstrates how to make. Visual Notes for Architects and Designers - Download as PDF File .pdf) or read online. The completely updated step-by-step guide to┬┐capturingexperiences in sketch format--regardless of artisticability Recording your ideas and observations.


Visual Notes For Architects And Designers Pdf

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This show-by-example sourcebook clearly illustrates proven methods and procedures for keeping a highly useful visual notebook. Visual Notes for Architects and Designers by Norman Crowe & Paul Laseau is Art &. Architecture The absolutely adapted step-by-step adviser. Visual notes for architects and designers by Norman Crowe, , Van Nostrand Reinhold edition, in English.

The difference is that a flow reference can serve in both the "continue to" and "continue from" capacities, while a continuation point can only be one or the other. If you don't need an element to play both roles, you probably don't need to use a flow. Basic concepts for conditional elements With increasing frequency, information architectures and interaction designs are reshaped dynamically by the system as the user moves through the site.

This reshaping is accomplished by means of conditional logic, and the remaining elements of this vocabulary are specific to conditional logic structures. Here's a basic conceptual model for application of conditional elements: The system keeps track of one or more attributes.

These attributes may be particular to: the user such as user type the session such as login status the content being accessed such as subject matter or they may exist "in the world" such as the time or date. Attributes have values "3 p. The association of an attribute with a particular value is called a condition. Conditions are evaluated by the system to determine if they are true. In a static architecture, every path is presented to every user under every circumstance, and each path always leads to the same result.

In a dynamic architecture, the system decides which paths or results are presented to the user based upon evaluating one or more conditions. To minimize clutter in our diagrams, these conditions are typically described in a footnote or appendix entry accompanying the diagram. Making choices: decision points When one user action may generate one of a number of results, the system must make a decision about which result is to be presented.

Perhaps the most common example of this is error handling on form submission. We call this a decision point, and as in traditional flow charts, it is represented by a diamond. Figure An example use of a decision point in a login sequence Note that arrows must be used in conjunction with decision points to clarify whether associated elements are upstream or downstream from the decision point. A conditional connector represented by a dashed line is used when a path may or may not be presented to the user depending upon whether one or more conditions are met.

Figure 11a: [left] A conditional connector Figure 11b: [right] A conditional arrow For example, there may be a page containing sensitive information that only company employees should have access to.

The condition in this case would be the user type employee ; if the condition is met, the path is made available. If not, no path exists.

Multiple choice: conditional branches When the system must select one path among a number of mutually exclusive options to be presented to the user, we use a conditional branch triangle.

Upstream elements connect to one point of the triangle; downstream elements connect to the opposite side.

Figure A conditional branch The example shown in figure 12 looks a lot like the decision point example above in figure 10 , but the behavior described here is quite different. In the decision point example, only one path or navigational element was presented to the user; where that path took the user was dependent upon certain conditions.

In figure 12, the system is making a similar decision, but it happens before the user action. The conditional branch indicates that the system is deciding which path will be presented to the user. As with conditional connectors and arrows , a conditional branch may provide the user with no path at all a null result.

The difference here is that with a conditional branch a null result may not be permitted at all; and if it is permitted, it is one of three or more possible results. Indicate whether the branch permits a null result in your footnote or appendix entry. Choose one or more: conditional selectors The conditional selector element represented by a trapezoid functions much like the conditional branch , with one important difference: with the selector, the various downstream paths are not mutually exclusive.

Figure A conditional selector The most common application of the conditional selector is in results generated by a search engine. In this case, the search results page would appear upstream from the selector; the condition is the search criteria input by the user; the downstream paths would lead to the content pages indexed by the search engine. As with a conditional branch, a conditional selector may generate a null result -- in fact, this is far more common with a selector than with a branch.

One decision, many paths: clusters Some conditional structures require that the system present more than one path based upon certain conditions. We associate these paths together in the structure with a cluster represented by a circle.

The cluster can appear downstream from either a conditional branch or a conditional selector. Figure A cluster downstream from a branch The structure illustrated in Figure 14 functions pretty much like a normal conditional branch, but for one condition we are presenting more than one path to the user. So if the attribute being evaluated has value x, the user sees a path to page B; but if the attribute has value y, the user sees paths to both page C and page D.

When one or more conditions applies to a group of pages, those pages are enclosed within a conditional area -- a rounded-corner rectangle like a standard area, but with the dashed-line treatment of a conditional connector.

Figure An example use of a conditional area where a secure connection is required Conditional areas are applied most commonly in situations involving access permissions, such as when a valid login or encrypted SSL connection is required.

Unlike the other types of areas, conditional areas are associated with a result, which is generated in the event that the condition s are not fulfilled. Conclusion If you'd like to see how the whole system comes together, here's a sample diagram of the information architecture and interaction design of MetaFilter. I wasn't involved in the development of this site; this diagram was simply reverse-engineered from it.

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Eric Turner's quick reference guide is an easy one-page description of all the elements. And Scott Larson created this handy cheatsheet for quick reference to the various conditional elements. And for those interested in creating their own shape libraries for use with an application other than the ones below, here's a PDF of all the shapes thanks to Ross Olson for the suggestion.

Use labels to identify these attributes or as with connectors , refer to notes elsewhere in the document if you have a lot to say.

Figure 7: An example use of an area to represent a pop-up window Many architectures involve repeating the same basic structure as it is applied to a number of functionally identical information elements. For example, you may have a product catalog in which each product has a number of pages associated with it.

You could draw an instance of this structure for each product, but why waste your time? Just use an iterative area -- a stack of rounded-corner rectangles -- instead.

Visual Notes for Architects and Designers, 2nd Edition

Figure 8: An example use of an iterative area to represent a repeated structure in a product catalog Note that connectors and arrows don't actually point to the areas themselves. The area elements serve only to enclose the pages. Areas should be applied carefully -- it's very easy to get caught up capturing all kinds of details with area elements that don't manifest in the user experience such as which pages are hosted on which servers or otherwise interfere with the diagram's overall objective of communicating the macrostructure.

Reusable components: flow areas and references Some interaction designs require a sequence of steps like a login procedure, for instance to appear repeatedly in different contexts throughout the design. Often these sequences are merely a component of one or more larger tasks the user is trying to accomplish. This is analogous to the concept of a subroutine in computer programming. Such a reusable sequence is called a flow, and it is represented in the diagram through two elements: the flow area, which encloses the flow itself; and the flow reference, which serves as a sort of "placeholder" for the flow in every context in which it is repeated.

Both elements have the same basic shape, a rectangle with the corners clipped off or, if you prefer, a distorted octagon. Figure 9a: [left] A flow reference serves as both a "continue to" point and a "continue from" point Figure 9b: [right] The flow area referenced in 9a Flow areas also require the use of two special types of continuation points : entry points and exit points.

These are placed outside the flow area, while continuation points within the flow area indicate that the flow spans multiple diagrams. Flow references themselves function very much like continuation points.

The objective of both types of elements is the same: to allow the architect to break up the diagram across pages. The difference is that a flow reference can serve in both the "continue to" and "continue from" capacities, while a continuation point can only be one or the other. If you don't need an element to play both roles, you probably don't need to use a flow. Basic concepts for conditional elements With increasing frequency, information architectures and interaction designs are reshaped dynamically by the system as the user moves through the site.

This reshaping is accomplished by means of conditional logic, and the remaining elements of this vocabulary are specific to conditional logic structures. Here's a basic conceptual model for application of conditional elements: The system keeps track of one or more attributes. These attributes may be particular to: the user such as user type the session such as login status the content being accessed such as subject matter or they may exist "in the world" such as the time or date.

Attributes have values "3 p.

The association of an attribute with a particular value is called a condition. Conditions are evaluated by the system to determine if they are true.

In a static architecture, every path is presented to every user under every circumstance, and each path always leads to the same result. In a dynamic architecture, the system decides which paths or results are presented to the user based upon evaluating one or more conditions. To minimize clutter in our diagrams, these conditions are typically described in a footnote or appendix entry accompanying the diagram.

Making choices: decision points When one user action may generate one of a number of results, the system must make a decision about which result is to be presented. Perhaps the most common example of this is error handling on form submission. We call this a decision point, and as in traditional flow charts, it is represented by a diamond.

Figure An example use of a decision point in a login sequence Note that arrows must be used in conjunction with decision points to clarify whether associated elements are upstream or downstream from the decision point.

Visual Notes for Architects and Designers

A conditional connector represented by a dashed line is used when a path may or may not be presented to the user depending upon whether one or more conditions are met.

Figure 11a: [left] A conditional connector Figure 11b: [right] A conditional arrow For example, there may be a page containing sensitive information that only company employees should have access to. The condition in this case would be the user type employee ; if the condition is met, the path is made available.

If not, no path exists. Multiple choice: conditional branches When the system must select one path among a number of mutually exclusive options to be presented to the user, we use a conditional branch triangle.

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Upstream elements connect to one point of the triangle; downstream elements connect to the opposite side. Figure A conditional branch The example shown in figure 12 looks a lot like the decision point example above in figure 10 , but the behavior described here is quite different. In the decision point example, only one path or navigational element was presented to the user; where that path took the user was dependent upon certain conditions. In figure 12, the system is making a similar decision, but it happens before the user action.

The conditional branch indicates that the system is deciding which path will be presented to the user. As with conditional connectors and arrows , a conditional branch may provide the user with no path at all a null result. The difference here is that with a conditional branch a null result may not be permitted at all; and if it is permitted, it is one of three or more possible results.

Indicate whether the branch permits a null result in your footnote or appendix entry. Would you like to change to the United States site? Norman Crowe , Paul Laseau.

Recording your ideas and observations primarily in pictures instead of words can help you become more creative and constructive on the job, no matter what your level of artistic ability. Featuring completely new coverage of visual note-taking in a digital world, Visual Notes for Architects and Designers, Second Edition demonstrates how to make rapid, notational sketches that serve as visual records for future reference, as well as improve understanding and facilitate the development of ideas.

It shows you how to expand your knowledge of a subject beyond what is gained through observation or verbal representation alone. You gain access to simple techniques for collecting, analyzing, and applying information.

Crowe and Laseau examine the relationship between note-taking, visualization, and creativity. They give practical guidance on how to develop:. Numerous examples demonstrate some of the many uses of visual notes.We can collaborate on projects anchor the presumption that it is not possible to bypass it in instantly together with the team of multiple co-workers no the architectural praxis and thus education. Figure An example use of a decision point in a login sequence Note that arrows must be used in conjunction with decision points to clarify whether associated elements are upstream or downstream from the decision point.

A monitor and two LCD-projectors provide facilitating a recording of both camera and touchscreen three different screens: one running the collaborative system simultaneously.

Simple elements: pages, files, and stacks thereof The basic unit of user experience on the Web is, of course, the page, which we represent as a simple rectangle. Authors, whose matter where they are. Basic concepts for conditional elements With increasing frequency, information architectures and interaction designs are reshaped dynamically by the system as the user moves through the site.

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